nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

In my local history research, when I’m quoting a monetary value from the past I also give the equivalent in modern terms, using the Bank of England inflation calculator. This helps understanding to some extent, but leads to things like the modern-equivalent annual rent for a shop plus living accommodation being given as £5,846 (£50 in 1870), which feels absurdly low.

Then I saw an essay going around at the moment, “How do we know the history of extreme poverty”? from the Our World In Data project, which is not only very interesting but also includes data on historical per-capita GDP in England (adjusted for inflation and including non-market production such as households growing their own food).

This made me wonder if I should move to using per-capita-GDP-adjusted inflation-adjusted prices instead of just inflation-adjusted prices. Using the example above, the annual shophouse rent quoted would map to £42,666 (per-capita GDP was £4,149 in 1870 and £30,281 in 2016, so £5,846 in 1870 is equivalent to £5846*£30281/£4149 today), which feels rather more realistic.

Obviously I can’t be the first historian to think of this, but I haven’t managed to find any discussion or guidelines on it, partly because my Google searches keep filling up with economics and accounting instead.

Does anyone have any thoughts on this, or can see an error in my reasoning, or can point me at existing guidelines? (No need to point out rounding errors in the maths — I’ve simplified for clarity.) (Also, for those who don’t know, I have no formal historical training whatsoever. I intend to do something about this at some point.)

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per usual, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Definitely recommend:

  • The Steerswoman, The Outskirter’s Secret, The Lost Steersman, and The Language of Power, Rosemary Kirstein (cw: violence, torture, violent death, xenophobia)
  • The Second Mango, Climbing the Date Palm, A Harvest of Ripe Figs, The Olive Conspiracy, and Tales From Perach, Shira Glassman (all re-reads) (cw: incest jokes, homophobia)

Maybe recommend:

  • The Magicians, The Magician King, and The Magician’s Land, Lev Grossman (all re-reads) (cw: violence, murder, rape, fatphobia, weirdness around queerness that doesn't quite reach the level of homophobia, mental illness oneupmanship, suicidal thoughts, amputation)
  • The Freeze-Frame Revolution, Peter Watts (cw: mass murder, solitary life imprisonment)
  • The Expert System's Brother, Adrian Tchaikovsky (cw: body horror, starvation, murder)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Iain M Banks, Paul Kincaid
  • Buying Time, E M Brown (cw: black woman killed to provide character development for white woman, women killed to provide character development for man, homophobia used as set dressing, fatphobia, women are fungible, creepy men in their 50s in love with teenage women)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per usual, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Definitely recommend:

  • The Comfortable Courtesan, volumes 1–12, L A Hall (re-read) (cw: racism, racial slurs, anti-semitism, colonialism, rape, violence, murder, animal death, forced institutionalisation, miscarriage, child death)

Maybe recommend:

  • The City Of Brass, S A Chakraborty (cw: slavery, torture, racism, genocide, violence, possession, mutilation)
  • Convenience Store Woman, Sayaka Murata (cw: misogyny, ablism, emotional abuse)
  • Rickshaw Boy, Lao She translated by Howard Goldblatt (cw: coercion to drink alcohol, implied rape, misogyny, child death)
  • The Stopping Places: A Journey Through Gipsy Britain, Damian Le Bas (cw: racism, racial slurs)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • After The Party, Cressida Connolly (cw: anti-semitism, POV fascists, fascist apologism, animal death)
  • Just One Damned Thing After Another, Jodi Taylor (cw: violence, voyeurism, animal death, pointless heterosexual drama)
  • Mr Fox, Helen Oyeyemi (DNF) (cw: murder)
  • The Old Man And The Sea, Ernest Hemingway (cw: animal death)
  • Onyx & Ivory, Mindee Arnett (DNF)
  • Swordspoint, Ellen Kushner (DNF)

I also tried to read State Of Emergency by Jeremy Tiang (cw: child abuse), but by the time I got to the end of my sample it had become unavailable in the Kindle store! Maybe one day it will come back.

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.) Do you have any opinions (good or bad) on the books above?

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per usual, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Definitely recommend:

  • Word By Word, Kory Stamper (cw: racial slurs, ablist slurs)
  • Untouchable, Mulk Raj Anand (re-read) (cw: racism, casteism, racial slurs, colonialism)
  • The Emperor’s Soul, Brandon Sanderson (cw: race as destiny)
  • The Devil's Novice, Dead Man's Ransom, The Pilgrim of Hate, An Excellent Mystery, The Raven in the Foregate, The Rose Rent, The Hermit of Eyton Forest, The Confession of Brother Haluin, The Heretic's Apprentice, The Holy Thief, Brother Cadfael's Penance, Ellis Peters (all re-reads) (cw: child betrothal, approval of the Crusades, violence, murder, self-harm, slavery, fatphobia, ablism, ablist slurs)

Maybe recommend:

  • The Red Threads of Fortune (re-read), The Black Tides of Heaven (re-read), and The Descent of Monsters, J Y Yang (cw: child death, animal death, graphic descriptions of dead bodies)
  • Starlings, Jo Walton
  • Stuart: A Life Backwards, Alexander Masters (re-read) (cw: violence, self-harm, fatphobia, racial slurs, ablism, rape, child abuse)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • When We Were Orphans, Kazuo Ishiguro (re-read) (cw: misogyny, racism, graphic descriptions of dead bodies)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.) Do you have any opinions (good or bad) on the books above?

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per usual, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask. This month’s selection was a bit more diverse than last month’s!

Definitely recommend:

  • Ammonite, Nicola Griffith

Maybe recommend:

  • Surrey Killing Fields, Croydon Natural History and Scientific Society (cw: animal death)
  • Pulchritude, Ana Mardoll (DNF) (cw: mild body horror)
  • The Odyssey, translated by Emily Wilson (DNF) (cw: slavery, rape, murder)
  • Deluxe, Dana Thomas (cw: racism, classism, child abuse, violence)
  • Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, Kelly Robson (cw: extreme body modification, murder) (extra warning: if you buy this on Kindle, when you get to the end it shows you an author page which includes a disturbing cover image from one of the author's other books)
  • The Wrong Stars, Tim Pratt (re-read)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Watchmaker of Filigree Street (cw: internalised misogyny, casual racism)
  • Empress of a Thousand Skies, Rhoda Belleza (DNF)
  • The Dreaming Stars, Tim Pratt (DNF)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.) Do you have any opinions (good or bad) on the books above?

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

Having done a re-read of Katharine Kerr’s Daggerspell in August’s reading, I decided to re-read the entire series (15 books), which took up the whole of September. So last month’s booklist is:

Maybe recommend:

cw for some/all of the below (I can't remember exactly what was in which books): child abuse, paedophilia, violence, incest, slavery, possession, whorephobia, fatphobia, homophobia, rape, murder, everyone-evil-is-gay, torture.

  • Darkspell, Katharine Kerr
  • Dawnspell, Katharine Kerr
  • Dragonspell, Katharine Kerr
  • A Time of Exile, Katharine Kerr
  • A Time of Omens, Katharine Kerr
  • A Time of War, Katharine Kerr
  • A Time of Justice, Katharine Kerr
  • The Red Wyvern, Katharine Kerr
  • The Black Raven, Katharine Kerr
  • The Fire Dragon, Katharine Kerr
  • The Gold Falcon, Katharine Kerr
  • The Spirit Stone, Katharine Kerr
  • The Shadow Isle, Katharine Kerr
  • The Silver Mage, Katharine Kerr

My feelings about this series are complicated. I’ve read it from start to finish twice now. I love the premise, the complex plotting is handled very well, and I’m fond of several of the characters. But it’s clear that this world was built without the author thinking that queer, trans, or disabled people might want to see themselves in it, and I’m a bit fed up of that sort of thing. I would love to see a series with this sort of structure written by someone more diverse and intersectional in their thinking.

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Recommend: Nothing for a “definitely recommend” this month!

Maybe recommend:

  • The Armor Of Light, Melissa Scott and Lisa A Barnett (possession, discussion of paedophilia)
  • Eat Up, Ruby Tandoh
  • All Systems Red, Martha Wells
  • So You Want To Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo (DNF)
  • Semiosis, Sue Burke (cw: violence, murder, rape)
  • Senlin Ascends, Josiah Bancroft (cw: murder, violence, slavery)
  • Nineteen Eighty Four, George Orwell (re-read) (cw: classism, racism, torture, slavery)
  • A Burglar's Guide to the City, Geoff Manaugh
  • Daggerspell, Katharine Kerr (cw: child abuse, violence, incest, slavery, possession, whorephobia, possibly femmephobia)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Free Food For Millionaires, Min Jin Lee (cw: dieting, domestic abuse including violence, sexual coercion, ablist slurs) (DNF)
  • Resistance, BR Sanders (DNF)
  • Unidentified Funny Objects 2, edited by Alex Shvartsman
  • The Boy Who Loved Too Much, Jennifer Latson (cw: ablism, own-voice-erasure, fatphobia, Simon Baron-Cohen)
  • New York 2140, Kim Stanley Robinson (DNF)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.) Do you have any opinions (good or bad) on the books above?

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Recommend:

  • Ariah, BR Sanders (cw: police brutality, internalized homophobia, racism, rape, incest, conscription)
  • Spinning Silver, Naomi Novik (cw: anti-semitism, violence)
  • Bad Blood, John Carreyrou
  • Circe, Madeline Miller (cw: rape, slavery, murder)

Maybe recommend:

  • The Last Place You Look (re-read) and What You Want To See, Kristen Lepionka (cw: imprisonment, rape, violence, alcoholism)
  • Lark Rise To Candleford, Flora Thompson (cw: bullying, child abuse, racism, blackface, ableism, domestic violence, racial slurs)
  • Under The Pendulum Sun, Jeannette Ng (cw: incest)
  • Record Of A Spaceborn Few, Becky Chambers

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Ascension, Jacqueline Koyanagi (DNF)
  • Give It To Me, Ana Castillo (DNF)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.) Do you have any opinions (good or bad) on the books above?

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

Hello! Next year’s Croydon Fun Weekend will run from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 January 2019. Please put a note in your diaries!

I do have a couple of related requests. Firstly, in previous years there’s been a children’s soft play session on the Friday afternoon; however, most of the regular child attendees are now in school and so unable to make it. I’m happy to run this session if there’s enough interest, but if you want it to happen then you need to speak up! You don’t have to definitely commit to it, especially this far in advance — I just want an indication of interest. So if you’re interested in bringing a child to a soft play/chat/lunch/snacks session on Friday 26 January, please let me know.

Secondly, I’m looking for people who want to get involved in running and/or organising the weekend. Would you like to lead a guided walk or pub crawl? Organise an activity we’ve not done before? Help with publicity in advance? Be the designated person who books a restaurant, keeps track of RSVPs, and turns up early to make sure everything’s ready? If so, let me know.

“Let me know” can be via the poll below, or a comment on this post, or on Twitter (@Kake or @croydn), or by email (kake@earth.li).

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 13


.

View Answers

Hello Kake!
12 (92.3%)

I’m potentially interested in bringing a child to a soft play session in Croydon on the afternoon of Friday 25 January
0 (0.0%)

I’m potentially interested in helping run and/or organise the CFW
2 (15.4%)

I like ticking boxes
13 (100.0%)

The thing(s) I would like to do to help with the CFW is/are...

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Recommend:

  • Lifelode, Jo Walton (re-read) (cw: child death)
  • Diaspora, Greg Egan (re-read)
  • The Player Of Games, Iain M Banks (re-read) (cw: violence, torture, rape)
  • Look To Windward, Iain M Banks (re-read) (cw: violence, body horror, suicide)
  • Sorcerer to the Crown, Zen Cho (re-read) (cw: slavery, racism)

Maybe recommend:

  • The Algebraist, Iain M Banks (re-read) (cw: violence, torture, child abuse)
  • Inversions, Iain M Banks (re-read) (cw: child abuse, child death, torture, violence)
  • State of the Art, Iain M Banks (re-read) (short stories)
  • Is That A Fish In Your Ear, David Bellis (DNF)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • The Diary Of A Bookseller, Shaun Blythell
  • The Root, Na'amen Gobert Tilahun (DNF)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.) Do you have any opinions (good or bad) on the books above?

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, by default I’m just stating whether I’d recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it’s a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Recommend:

  • Provenance, Ann Leckie (re-read)

Maybe recommend:

  • Rosewater, Tade Thompson (DNF) (cw: body horror, other horror, violence)
  • The Golem and the Djinni, Helene Wecker
  • A Winter Away, Elizabeth Fair
  • The Hydrogen Sonata, Iain M Banks (re-read) (cn: violence)
  • The Black Tides of Heaven and The Red Threads of Fortune, JY Yang (cn: child death, violence)
  • Updraft, Fran Wilde (DNF) (cn: monsters appearing out of thin air, which I Really Do Not Like and is the reason I didn’t get past the end of the Kindle sample)
  • Phoresis, Greg Egan

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Witches of New York, Ami McKay
  • Blackfish City, Sam J Miller (cn: violence, involuntary institutionalisation)
  • Sarum, Edward Rutherford (DNF)
  • Chameleon Moon, RoAna Sylver (DNF)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.)

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, by default I’m just stating whether I'd recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it's a re-read, and whether I can remember there being any content that needs to be warned for (cw). I’m happy to expand on the reasons for my opinions if anyone is interested though — just comment and ask.

Recommend:

  • A Taste Of Honey, Kai Ashante Wilson (cw: homophobia)
  • The Second Mango, Climbing the Date Palm, A Harvest of Ripe Figs, The Olive Conspiracy, and Tales From Perach, Shira Glassman

Maybe recommend:

  • The Tea Master And The Detective, Aliette De Bodard
  • The Native Heath and The Mingham Air, Elizabeth Fair (cw: colonialism)
  • Dichronauts, Greg Egan (re-read)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Station Eleven, Emily St John Mandel (re-read) (cw: suicide)
  • Thinking, Fast And Slow, Daniel Kahneman (DNF) (cw: food moralising)
  • Cat Country, Lao She translated by William A Lyell (DNF) (cw: child abuse, sexism, rape)
  • Forest of a Thousand Lanterns, Julie Dao (DNF)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.)

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, I'm not writing reviews or even mini-reviews, but just stating whether I'd recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it's a re-read, and whether I have any content warnings (cw). Please don't take the content warnings as definitive — most of them are done from memory and I may have forgotten some.

Recommend:

  • Fangirl, Rainbow Rowell
  • Digger, Ursula Vernon (re-read) (cw: child death, domestic abuse)
  • Permutation City, Greg Egan (re-read) (cw: domestic violence, child neglect)

Maybe recommend:

  • Waiting, Ha Jin (cw: rape, ablist slurs)
  • Clockwork Boys (re-read) and The Wonder Engine, T Kingfisher
  • Mr Ma And Son, Lao She translated by William Dolby (cw: racism)
  • The Wrong Stars, Tim Pratt (cw: genocide, slavery, non-consensual body modification)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Brother's Ruin (re-read) and Weaver's Lament, Emma Newman
  • Penghulu, Suratman Markasan translated by Solehah Ishak (DNF)
  • Prairie Fires, Caroline Fraser (cw: racism, genocide)
  • Intercession, Isa Kamari
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

As per last month, I'm not writing reviews or even mini-reviews, but just stating whether I'd recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it's a re-read, and whether I have any content warnings (cw). Please don't take the content warnings as definitive — most of them are done from memory and I may have forgotten some.

Recommend:

  • Durians Are Not The Only Fruit, Wong Yoon Wah translated by Jeremy Tiang
  • Incandescence, Greg Egan (re-read)
  • The Clockwork Rocket, The Eternal Flame, and The Arrows Of Time, Greg Egan (re-reads) (cw: incest, child death)
  • Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine (cw: child abuse, domestic violence, fatphobia)
  • Beasts And Super-Beasts, Saki (re-read)
  • The Sword Smith, Eleanor Arnason (re-read) (cw: slavery)

Maybe recommend:

  • When William Came, Saki (cw: anti-semitism, fatphobia)
  • Whose Turn For The Stairs, Staying On Past The Terminus, and Last Dance At The Wrecker's Ball (cw: domestic violence, racial slurs, child death)
  • Hild, Nicola Griffith (re-read) (cw: slavery, rape, incest, child death, graphic violence)

What have you recently read and enjoyed? (Feel free to point towards posts on your own journal.)

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

I decided to start listing books I've read here, so here's the first batch. (I was previously doing this over at [community profile] bitesizedreading but decided I wanted an easier way of referring back — I thoroughly recommend the community though).

I'm not writing reviews or even mini-reviews, but just stating whether I'd recommend the book (yes/maybe/no), whether I decided not to finish it (DNF), whether it's a re-read, and whether I have any content warnings (cw). Please don't take the content warnings as definitive — most of them are done from memory and I may have forgotten some.

Recommend:

  • Provenance, Ann Leckie
  • Home Fire, Kamila Shamsie
  • Carry On, Rainbow Rowell
  • A Matter Of Oaths, Helen S Wright

Maybe recommend:

  • The Martian, Andy Weir
  • git commit murder, Michael Warren Lucas (cw: fatphobia)
  • Remnant Population, Elizabeth Moon
  • Clocktaur Boys, T Kingfisher
  • The Book of the Unnamed Midwife, Meg Elison (cw: rape)
  • My Dear Aunt Flora, Elizabeth Cadell
  • Redemption In Indigo, Karen Lord (cw: eating disorder)
  • Bethany, Adam Roberts
  • An Unkindness Of Ghosts, Rivers Solomon (DNF)
  • The Small House At Allington, Anthony Trollope (re-read) (cw: racism)
  • The Unbearable Bassington, Saki (re-read) (cw: child abuse, racism/colonialism)
  • All These Earths, F M Busby (re-read)

Wouldn’t recommend:

  • Past Mortems, Carla Valentine (DNF) (cw: fatphobia)
  • All Our Wrong Todays, Elan Mastai
  • The Basilisk Murders, Andrew Hickey
  • How To Understand Your Gender, Alex Iantaffi and Meg-John Barker (DNF)
  • Tomb Of The Fathers, Eleanor Arnason (re-read)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

Hello! As previously noted, the sixth annual Croydon Fun Weekend will run from Friday 26 to Sunday 28 January this year. I very much hope you can come!

Here's the schedule, and it's also under a cut below, for convenience.

Important things to note:

  • Friday afternoon: Everyone is welcome at Beanies, but only children aged 5 and under are allowed on the soft play equipment.
  • Friday and Saturday evenings: If you want to come to dinner at Abshar and/or Osushi, please let me know ASAP, but preferably at the latest by noon on Monday 22 January. It's fine to put yourself down as a "probable" — I just want to give the restaurant a rough idea of how many we'll be.
  • Financial considerations: There is no charge for anything during the weekend aside from your own food/drink and entrance to Beanies for children (adults go free). If there are any sessions you'd like to come to but can't afford to pay food/drinks/Beanies costs for, please let me know and I'll find a solution.

Finally, if you haven't received any emails about this event, and you would like to receive them in the future, please let me know! I haven't had any bounces from the batch I sent recently, but it's always possible I have an old email address for you or even that I've accidentally missed you off the list.

Full schedule under the cut. )
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

Queer Code London is putting on a lightning talk session at Makers Academy on Thursday 28 September from 6pm-9pm, and we have several slots still open for speakers.

If you're within reach of London, identify as queer (LGBTQ+), and would like to give a 5-15 minute talk on anything related to tech or the tech community, please check out the event info and fill in the application form.

If you’d like to speak but can only come if your travel expenses are paid, please let me know, and we'll see what we can arrange. There's no entry fee to the event, and food will be provided free of charge to both speakers and audience.

(I don't yet have info on accessibility of the venue, but am hoping to get some on Friday, and will update this post then.)

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

Just a reminder that the 2018 Croydon Fun Weekend will run from Friday 26 January to Sunday 28 January.

Confirmed activities include a pervasive game and a pub crawl, while likely other activities include a soft play session, a children's craft session, a history-themed walk, and of course lots of delicious food from all over the world.

If you’re interested in helping to organise the weekend or in running any sessions, please let me know! For an idea of the general structure, see programmes from previous years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 26


.

View Answers

Hello Kake!
23 (88.5%)

Yay Croydon Fun Weekend!
14 (53.8%)

Yay Croydon!
13 (50.0%)

Yay ticking boxes!
20 (76.9%)

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

I seem to have got involved in organising Queer Code London. We have a breakfast meet in Central London on Tuesday 1 August Tuesday 8 August, 7:30am-9am, and I’d love to see as many people there as possible.

The breakfast is free and includes vegetarian options, and the building is step-free accessible. You’ll need to join the Meetup group to see the location, but it's in Central London within a couple of minutes’ walk of a zone 1 station. Spaces are limited, so sign up ASAP.

No allies, please – this event is for queer coders only — but please pass this on as widely as you like.

nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

If you were going northbound on the Northern Line and wanted the most efficient change to the Bakerloo Line, would you do it at Waterloo, Embankment, or Charing Cross?

I asked [personal profile] bob and he wasn't sure. Looking at the Tube map, the only station where the Northern and Bakerloo lines are on the same “blob” is Charing Cross — but am I misremembering that blobness is related to ease of changing?